Lab assignment earthquakes

Finally, there is another whole category of earthquake waves known as surface waves. Vibrations that travel through the Earth.

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There are lots of different kinds of surface waves. So as a compressional and stretching motion as a P-wave passes by. The point within the earth where the actual movement takes place is called the focus. They are the second ones to arrive at any particular recording station that detects an earthquake. For the lab though, you need to focus in on a couple of different kinds of waves. The second method assumes that earthquake waves speed up with increasing distance, and the lag time graph Figure 6 may be used to find either the lag time or the distance to the epicenter. A typical seismogram of an earthquake has three prominent wave patterns. In order to do that, you need to know something about earthquake waves. You can probably guess the definition for these, these are waves that travel along the Earth's surface or just slightly under the surface. The second type of body wave is known as an S-wave. To do this, you may need to "borrow" extra seconds from the minutes column much like grade school arithmetic, where fractions may be borrowed from the whole numbers column. Finally, the L-waves "long" or "Love" arrive. In this lab, you're going to work out the size, and the location, of a particular earthquake.

One type of seismograph is a visible recording machine, shown in Figure 2. The point within the earth where the actual movement takes place is called the focus. See how accurately you can locate the epicenter of this quake.

The S stands for secondary, and it also stands for shear. What is the lag time for this earthquake? A typical seismogram of an earthquake has three prominent wave patterns.

Virtual courseware virtual earthquake

To do this, you may need to "borrow" extra seconds from the minutes column much like grade school arithmetic, where fractions may be borrowed from the whole numbers column. The first method assumes that earthquake waves travel at constant speed no speeding up nor slowing down , and uses a mathematical formula to determine velocity, distance, or time, for four earthquake recording stations located in the western United States. A typical seismogram of an earthquake has three prominent wave patterns. The time difference, as recorded on a clock, between when the P-waves and S-waves arrive is called the lag time. It turns out this is a very efficient way of transmitting energy through the Earth. If you are given information about how fast P-waves and S-waves each travel, a certain lag time will correspond to a certain distance that may be traveled by earthquake waves. We call them body waves. Using the clock time numbers listed in your lab handout, the lag times may be easily calculated. To calculated lag time using the arithmetic method, a simplified method using rounded off speed numbers is illustrated below. The second method assumes that earthquake waves speed up with increasing distance, and the lag time graph Figure 6 may be used to find either the lag time or the distance to the epicenter. If it can be shown that earthquake waves do not travel at constant speed, then this method is invalid. That's why they are first to get to any place after the earthquake occurs. I'm not going to go into all the details about seismic waves in this video because I know Dr. They can get quite complicated.

This investigation contains the seismograms from three different stations for an earthquake. In other words, if P-waves travel at 4. Using the clock time numbers listed in your lab handout, the lag times may be easily calculated. Since P-waves travel faster than S-waves do, the seismograph will detect P-waves arriving first, and S-waves will follow.

virtual earthquake lab

The first wave that arrives is the P-wave. The first method assumes that earthquake waves travel at constant speed no speeding up nor slowing downand uses a mathematical formula to determine velocity, distance, or time, for four earthquake recording stations located in the western United States.

earthquake triangulation virtual activity
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Earthquakes Living Lab: Finding Epicenters & Measuring Magnitudes